The Virtue of Vinegar: Lowers Blood Pressure, Balances Blood Sugar, and More

Vinegar is good for more than dressing salads—the sour, fermented liquid has been used for centuries to treat many ailments.Vinegar’s culinary and healing and culinary history dates back to 5000 B.C. During the fermentation process, alcohol transforms into vinegar. In ancient China, the resulting liquid was known as “bitter wine” and was used as a medicinal remedy for various ailments. Kuo-Pin Wu, the superintendent of Taiwan Xinyitang Heart Clinic, elaborated on the health benefits of vinegar and its diverse applications in daily life in The Epoch Times’ “Health 1+1” program.Medicinal Uses of VinegarMr. Wu stated that ancient medical texts contain numerous records of vinegar, highlighting its myriad medicinal benefits:Reduce swelling: Vinegar can be used to treat symptoms of swelling and suppuration (discharge of infection) from the body.Antimicrobial and antiviral effects: Vinegar can kill some germs. When cold symptoms first appear, it can be used can reduce bacterial and viral infections in the throat by diluting a tablespoon of salt and vinegar in hot water and using it as a mouthwash.Helps preserve foods: Vinegar is used to preserve and can foods, pickling, and in sauces such as chutneys. Its acetic acid keeps microorganisms from food and keeps it from spoiling.Aid digestion: For those who often experience acid reflux or bloating after meals, drinking a little vinegar can help promote smooth digestion.Revive from shock: Placing a cloth soaked in vinegar near the nose of a patient who faints suddenly from shock can provide a strong stimulus to wake them up. This method can be particularly helpful in keeping patients alert while awaiting emergency transport to the hospital. Another method involves placing hot charcoal in a bowl of vinegar, producing a vinegar-scented smoke that can be used to revive the patient by fumigating their mouth and nose.Recent studies have also found that vinegar offers many health benefits. Mr. Wu outlined some of these benefits:Lowers cholesterol: Vinegar may reduce cholesterol in the blood, thus preventing cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Research has shown that consuming apple cider vinegar can significantly lower serum total cholesterol and fasting blood sugar levels.Lower blood pressure: Vinegar, particularly apple cider vinegar may be used clinically to help lower blood pressure. The rich potassium content in apple cider vinegar helps remove excess sodium from the body, thereby maintaining mineral balance and reducing blood pressure.A systematic review indicated that vinegar can significantly reduce both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Incorporating vinegar consumption as part of patients’ dietary advice can serve as an adjunct treatment for hypertension.Lower blood sugar: The acetic acid in vinegar can slow down carbohydrate digestion in the gut, inhibiting sugar absorption and lowering blood sugar levels. This also reduces insulin secretion, which helps stabilize blood sugar. Mr. Wu shared that some diabetes patients have noticed more stable blood sugar levels after consuming plum vinegar.A randomized controlled trial showed that taking two teaspoons of vinegar with meals can effectively reduce postprandial blood sugar levels in healthy adults. The study also found that vinegar’s antiglycemic effects are related to the digestion of carbohydrates. Another clinical trial indicated that daily consumption of apple cider vinegar may be beneficial in managing blood sugar indices and lipid profiles in patients with Type 2 diabetes.Alleviate pain and soreness: Lactic acid buildup in the body can cause muscle soreness. Vinegar can help burn lactic acid, thereby relieving muscle soreness.Reduce uric acid: Accumulation of uric acid can lead to the formation of stones. Vinegar can help maintain a slightly alkaline environment by balancing the body’s acidity, thus reducing the risk of uric acid stones or kidney stones.A study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food in 2018 showed that soy vinegar extract, derived from fermented soybeans, can reduce uric acid levels and increase uric acid excretion in mice with hyperuricemia.Enhance skin appearance: Cell membranes are made up of lipids, which can turn into peroxidized lipids when oxidized, resulting in reduced skin elasticity, wrinkles, and dark spots. Acetic acid can reduce the production of peroxidized lipids, enhancing skin appearance and youthfulness.Get rid of hiccups: Drinking a small cup of vinegar can help relieve diaphragm spasms during severe hiccup episodes.Alleviate motion sickness: Traditional Chinese medicine believes that motion sickness can be improved by addressing gastrointestinal issues. Drinking a small cup of diluted vinegar is recommended to reduce symptoms of motion sickness.Improve nail fungus: Nail fungus is caused by a fungal infection, and vinegar can effectively inhibit the growth and proliferation of these microorganisms. Soaking the affected area in a solution of 4.23 ounces (1

The Virtue of Vinegar: Lowers Blood Pressure, Balances Blood Sugar, and More

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Vinegar is good for more than dressing salads—the sour, fermented liquid has been used for centuries to treat many ailments.

Vinegar’s culinary and healing and culinary history dates back to 5000 B.C. During the fermentation process, alcohol transforms into vinegar. In ancient China, the resulting liquid was known as “bitter wine” and was used as a medicinal remedy for various ailments. Kuo-Pin Wu, the superintendent of Taiwan Xinyitang Heart Clinic, elaborated on the health benefits of vinegar and its diverse applications in daily life in The Epoch Times’ “Health 1+1” program.
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Medicinal Uses of Vinegar

Mr. Wu stated that ancient medical texts contain numerous records of vinegar, highlighting its myriad medicinal benefits:
  • Reduce swelling: Vinegar can be used to treat symptoms of swelling and suppuration (discharge of infection) from the body.
  • Antimicrobial and antiviral effects: Vinegar can kill some germs. When cold symptoms first appear, it can be used can reduce bacterial and viral infections in the throat by diluting a tablespoon of salt and vinegar in hot water and using it as a mouthwash.
  • Helps preserve foods: Vinegar is used to preserve and can foods, pickling, and in sauces such as chutneys. Its acetic acid keeps microorganisms from food and keeps it from spoiling.
  • Aid digestion: For those who often experience acid reflux or bloating after meals, drinking a little vinegar can help promote smooth digestion.
  • Revive from shock: Placing a cloth soaked in vinegar near the nose of a patient who faints suddenly from shock can provide a strong stimulus to wake them up. This method can be particularly helpful in keeping patients alert while awaiting emergency transport to the hospital. Another method involves placing hot charcoal in a bowl of vinegar, producing a vinegar-scented smoke that can be used to revive the patient by fumigating their mouth and nose.
Recent studies have also found that vinegar offers many health benefits. Mr. Wu outlined some of these benefits:
  • Lowers cholesterol: Vinegar may reduce cholesterol in the blood, thus preventing cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Research has shown that consuming apple cider vinegar can significantly lower serum total cholesterol and fasting blood sugar levels.
  • Lower blood pressure: Vinegar, particularly apple cider vinegar may be used clinically to help lower blood pressure. The rich potassium content in apple cider vinegar helps remove excess sodium from the body, thereby maintaining mineral balance and reducing blood pressure.

A systematic review indicated that vinegar can significantly reduce both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Incorporating vinegar consumption as part of patients’ dietary advice can serve as an adjunct treatment for hypertension.

  • Lower blood sugar: The acetic acid in vinegar can slow down carbohydrate digestion in the gut, inhibiting sugar absorption and lowering blood sugar levels. This also reduces insulin secretion, which helps stabilize blood sugar. Mr. Wu shared that some diabetes patients have noticed more stable blood sugar levels after consuming plum vinegar.

A randomized controlled trial showed that taking two teaspoons of vinegar with meals can effectively reduce postprandial blood sugar levels in healthy adults. The study also found that vinegar’s antiglycemic effects are related to the digestion of carbohydrates. Another clinical trial indicated that daily consumption of apple cider vinegar may be beneficial in managing blood sugar indices and lipid profiles in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

  • Alleviate pain and soreness: Lactic acid buildup in the body can cause muscle soreness. Vinegar can help burn lactic acid, thereby relieving muscle soreness.
  • Reduce uric acid: Accumulation of uric acid can lead to the formation of stones. Vinegar can help maintain a slightly alkaline environment by balancing the body’s acidity, thus reducing the risk of uric acid stones or kidney stones.

A study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food in 2018 showed that soy vinegar extract, derived from fermented soybeans, can reduce uric acid levels and increase uric acid excretion in mice with hyperuricemia.

  • Enhance skin appearance: Cell membranes are made up of lipids, which can turn into peroxidized lipids when oxidized, resulting in reduced skin elasticity, wrinkles, and dark spots. Acetic acid can reduce the production of peroxidized lipids, enhancing skin appearance and youthfulness.
  • Get rid of hiccups: Drinking a small cup of vinegar can help relieve diaphragm spasms during severe hiccup episodes.
  • Alleviate motion sickness: Traditional Chinese medicine believes that motion sickness can be improved by addressing gastrointestinal issues. Drinking a small cup of diluted vinegar is recommended to reduce symptoms of motion sickness.
  • Improve nail fungus: Nail fungus is caused by a fungal infection, and vinegar can effectively inhibit the growth and proliferation of these microorganisms. Soaking the affected area in a solution of 4.23 ounces (120 grams) of vinegar in 33.81 fluid ounces (1,000 milliliters) of water for about 20 minutes regularly can gradually resolve the fungus.

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Practical Uses of Vinegar in Daily Life

In addition to the health benefits mentioned above, Mr. Wu also shared some practical uses of vinegar in daily life.
  • When cooking small fish, adding vinegar can help dissolve the calcium in the bones, facilitating its absorption by the body. It also softens the fish bones, allowing them to be eaten along with the fish.
  • When making bread, adding a few drops of vinegar to baking soda and mixing it into the flour can improve dough fermentation.
  • Before using a newly purchased frying pan, you can add a few drops of vinegar to clean the interior.
  • When grilling fish, brushing vinegar on the surface of the fish makes the skin less likely to stick to the grill.
  • Soaking raw fish in vinegar makes it easier to remove the skin.
  • Adding an equal amount of vinegar to water facilitates the cleaning of the slimy substance of abalone, shellfish, and taro.
  • When boiling eggs, adding a splash of vinegar prevents the egg white from leaking out even if the shell cracks.
  • When arranging flowers, dipping the stems in vinegar before placing them in a vase enhances the plant’s ability to absorb water, thereby prolonging their freshness.
  • When cooking kelp, adding a little vinegar can make it more tender.
  • Adding a little vinegar while cooking can enhance the flavor of the food, thereby reducing the need for salt.

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Soybeans With Vinegar for Lowering Blood Pressure

Mr. Wu shared a simple and easy-to-prepare dietary remedy—soybeans with vinegar—to help improve high blood pressure and constipation issues. As mentioned earlier, vinegar can reduce blood lipid levels, soften blood vessels, and manage or even lower blood pressure. Additionally, soybeans are rich in dietary fiber, which can alleviate constipation.

Preparation:

Prepare 7.05 ounces (200 grams) of unwashed organic soybeans and place them in a wide-mouthed bottle. Add 20.29 fluid ounces (600 milliliters) of vinegar, cover, and let it sit at room temperature for four days. On the fifth day, store the soybeans in the refrigerator. Eat five to 10 beans daily, gradually increasing the amount as tolerated.

Mr. Wu mentioned that one of his hypertensive patients started eating 15 to 20 vinegar soybeans daily. After about two weeks, his blood pressure began to stabilize. One to two months later, his blood pressure had dropped by 20 to 30 points.

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How to Pick the Right Vinegar?

Mr. Wu recommends opting for naturally fermented vinegar over synthetic varieties made with chemical additives or blends of synthetic and natural vinegar. When making a purchase, you can differentiate them by the following criteria:

1. Smell: Synthetic vinegar often has a pungent smell and can irritate the tongue, while naturally fermented vinegar is more mellow.

2. Price: Naturally fermented vinegar is typically two to three times more expensive than synthetic vinegar.

3. Brand reputation: It is advisable to purchase from reputable brands.

Note: Treatment methods may vary depending on the individual. Please consult with a health care professional for a specific treatment plan.

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