Xi Jinping Orders Beijing to ‘Launch International Fight’ by Influencing Foreign Laws

Chinese leader Xi Jinping told members of the Communist Party to influence international laws and to promote China’s socialist rule of law in a bid to safeguard and promote Beijing’s hegemonic ambition. “[We must] launch an international fight by using judicial methods,” Xi said in a speech that he delivered to Party cadres during the Politburo’s recent study session “on building a socialist legal system with Chinese characteristics,” according to a Feb. 15 report by Qiushi, the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) official bi-monthly theoretical journal. Xi said the main goal of reforming domestic laws and foreign-related laws is to show the world China’s rule of law system and to step up its influence in the rules-based international order. Xi revealed the regime has tried to take legal actions overseas to achieve its goals since the Party’s 18th Congress in November 2012, when Xi took office. Observers say China’s so-called rule of law is subject to the whims of the political elite. Any individual who fails to toe the Party line will face punishment and persecution. “Arbitrary arrest and confinement subject to the whims of the CCP is the real ‘rule of law’ in the PRC (mainland China),” wrote China observer Stu Cvrk in Dec. 11, 2021 article. Cvrk pointed out that millions of Chinese and ethnic and religious minorities can attest to this.  Xi Jinping applauds during the opening session of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 4, 2021. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images) Fighting the World Chinese media has widely promoted one sentence from Mao Zedong, the first chairman of communist China. He told the people to “fight with the heaven, fight with the earth, and fight with the people.” Now, Xi is repeating Mao’s narrative by ordering the regime “to launch an international fight.” “The world has entered a turbulent and reforming period. The international competition is increasingly manifested in the disputes over state systems, rules, and laws,” Xi said in his speech. “We must strengthen the legislation of foreign-related laws and regulations, to improve the efficiency of overseas law enforcement.” He then told the Party cadres that the situation is urgent and to focus on countering long-arm jurisdiction and sanctions and interference from other countries. In recent years CCP officials and state-owned enterprises were sanctioned by Western governments over human rights and trade violations. In June 2021, Beijing launched a series of “anti-foreign sanctions” rules as countermeasures against foreign nations enacting sanctions on China. The CCP persecutes its own people, including dissenters and members of ethnic minority and religious groups. It continues to threaten Taiwan into unifying it with the mainland, and exercise sovereignty in the Indo-Pacific region by building artificial islands and threatening countries that have competing claims in the South China Sea. Beijing has criticized other countries for calling out the regime’s abuses by claiming that they have no right to interfere in China’s internal affairs. The CCP has retaliated against America’s long-arm jurisdiction in which the U.S. judiciary can punish a suspect in a third country by using bilateral and multilateral agreements. For example, in December 2018, Canada arrested Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou on a U.S. extradition request related to fraud charges over her role in Huawei’s violations of U.S. sanctions against Iran through a shell company. Days later, Canadian citizens Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor were detained on baseless charges in China. In Sept. 24, 2021, the U.S. Justice Department reached a deferred prosecution agreement with Meng, in which she agreed to most of the charges against her while maintaining formal deniability regarding key charges relating to bank and wire fraud. On the same day, a Canadian court removed her bail conditions, allowing her to fly back to China. Shortly after Meng’s release, Beijing released the “two Michaels.” It’s believed that Meng’s release was a sign of victory for the Chinese regime’s “hostage diplomacy” tactic. In his speech, Xi ordered the regime to interfere with America’s long-arm jurisdiction by setting up a judicial cooperation with other countries and training Chinese citizens to become experts in international law. However, Xi admitted that China’s rule of law system has problems and domestic laws need to be reformed. He warned the regime “not to be misled by the Western styles and thoughts,” and China should walk its own path. Follow Nicole Hao is a Washington-based reporter focused on China-related topics. Before joining the Epoch Media Group in July 2009, she worked as a global product manager for a railway business in Paris, France.

Xi Jinping Orders Beijing to ‘Launch International Fight’ by Influencing Foreign Laws

Chinese leader Xi Jinping told members of the Communist Party to influence international laws and to promote China’s socialist rule of law in a bid to safeguard and promote Beijing’s hegemonic ambition.

“[We must] launch an international fight by using judicial methods,” Xi said in a speech that he delivered to Party cadres during the Politburo’s recent study session “on building a socialist legal system with Chinese characteristics,” according to a Feb. 15 report by Qiushi, the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) official bi-monthly theoretical journal.

Xi said the main goal of reforming domestic laws and foreign-related laws is to show the world China’s rule of law system and to step up its influence in the rules-based international order.

Xi revealed the regime has tried to take legal actions overseas to achieve its goals since the Party’s 18th Congress in November 2012, when Xi took office.

Observers say China’s so-called rule of law is subject to the whims of the political elite. Any individual who fails to toe the Party line will face punishment and persecution.

“Arbitrary arrest and confinement subject to the whims of the CCP is the real ‘rule of law’ in the PRC (mainland China),” wrote China observer Stu Cvrk in Dec. 11, 2021 article. Cvrk pointed out that millions of Chinese and ethnic and religious minorities can attest to this. 

Epoch Times Photo
Xi Jinping applauds during the opening session of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 4, 2021. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Fighting the World

Chinese media has widely promoted one sentence from Mao Zedong, the first chairman of communist China. He told the people to “fight with the heaven, fight with the earth, and fight with the people.”

Now, Xi is repeating Mao’s narrative by ordering the regime “to launch an international fight.”

“The world has entered a turbulent and reforming period. The international competition is increasingly manifested in the disputes over state systems, rules, and laws,” Xi said in his speech. “We must strengthen the legislation of foreign-related laws and regulations, to improve the efficiency of overseas law enforcement.”

He then told the Party cadres that the situation is urgent and to focus on countering long-arm jurisdiction and sanctions and interference from other countries.

In recent years CCP officials and state-owned enterprises were sanctioned by Western governments over human rights and trade violations. In June 2021, Beijing launched a series of “anti-foreign sanctions” rules as countermeasures against foreign nations enacting sanctions on China.

The CCP persecutes its own people, including dissenters and members of ethnic minority and religious groups. It continues to threaten Taiwan into unifying it with the mainland, and exercise sovereignty in the Indo-Pacific region by building artificial islands and threatening countries that have competing claims in the South China Sea.

Beijing has criticized other countries for calling out the regime’s abuses by claiming that they have no right to interfere in China’s internal affairs.

The CCP has retaliated against America’s long-arm jurisdiction in which the U.S. judiciary can punish a suspect in a third country by using bilateral and multilateral agreements. For example, in December 2018, Canada arrested Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou on a U.S. extradition request related to fraud charges over her role in Huawei’s violations of U.S. sanctions against Iran through a shell company. Days later, Canadian citizens Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor were detained on baseless charges in China.

In Sept. 24, 2021, the U.S. Justice Department reached a deferred prosecution agreement with Meng, in which she agreed to most of the charges against her while maintaining formal deniability regarding key charges relating to bank and wire fraud. On the same day, a Canadian court removed her bail conditions, allowing her to fly back to China.

Shortly after Meng’s release, Beijing released the “two Michaels.” It’s believed that Meng’s release was a sign of victory for the Chinese regime’s “hostage diplomacy” tactic.

In his speech, Xi ordered the regime to interfere with America’s long-arm jurisdiction by setting up a judicial cooperation with other countries and training Chinese citizens to become experts in international law.

However, Xi admitted that China’s rule of law system has problems and domestic laws need to be reformed. He warned the regime “not to be misled by the Western styles and thoughts,” and China should walk its own path.


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Nicole Hao is a Washington-based reporter focused on China-related topics. Before joining the Epoch Media Group in July 2009, she worked as a global product manager for a railway business in Paris, France.