Senators Woo and Oh Support Alleged Chinese Police Stations’ Lawsuit Against RCMP

Sen. Yuen Pau Woo and Sen. Victor Oh are lending support to two Montreal-based organizations that are launching a $2.5 million lawsuit against the RCMP. The organizations are currently under police investigation for allegedly operating as secret Chinese police stations."Together with my colleague, Sen. Victor Oh, we're very pleased to be in Montreal to show our solidarity and support for the Chinese community in Quebec, and particularly the organizations in Quebec," Mr. Woo said at a press conference held at SFCGM on Dec. 1.On Nov. 28, the two organizations, overseen by Xixi Li, who is also a Brossard city councillor, released a statement on the Chinese social media platform WeChat in which they accused the RCMP of initiating a "baseless public investigation." They said this has led to financial setbacks for the organizations, including a cut in government funding for both of them.In March, the Quebec Ministry of Immigration told The Epoch Times that it has decided to end partnership with the CSQRS and the SFCGM. According to official online records, the ministry allocated $1,948,221 to the CSQRS from 2012 to 2020 under its PRInt and PASI integration programs. During the same period and under the same programs, the ministry provided $4,989,694 to the SFCGM.Additionally, the organizations said the bank holding the mortgage for CSQRS and SFCGM has declared its intention not to renew the mortgage in March 2024.Related Stories11/30/202310/21/2023For his part, Mr. Woo also said that the RCMP has not provided a definition of what constitutes a Chinese police station, nor has it specified what illegal activities the two organizations have been engaged in. 'Not in the Criminal Code' May Chiu, a moderator for the Dec. 1 press conference, said the RCMP interviewed the board members of CSQRS and SFCGM, but did not provide them with information regarding the allegations that the organizations are facing.She claimed that there is a lack of evidence against the two organizations, stating that "being a police station is not in the Criminal Code." The Sino-Quebec Centre in Brossard, Quebec, is seen on March 9, 2023. RCMP says it's investigating this organization, along with the Chinese Family Service of Greater Montreal, which are allegedly clandestine overseas Chinese police service stations. (Noé Chartier/The Epoch Times)Sgt. Charles Poirier of the RCMP's C Division told The Epoch Times that the force can't offer further comments aside from confirming that the investigation "is still active.""There have been no arrests made on this file to date. We are still asking people to contact us if they're victims of or witness to criminal acts," he wrote in a statement in French. Promoting Chinese App That Surveils Users During the Dec. 1 press conference, Ms. Li denied that her organizations have engaged in any activities that could be considered foreign interference."We never did that, and I never get any complaint from any of our customers," she said.She further denied that a Chinese mobile application which the organizations have reportedly been promoting poses security risks to its users.The app, called Qiaobao, is being promoted by CSQRS and SFCGM to the local Chinese community. The app is developed by a Beijing-based technology company that operates as a subsidiary of the China News Service, which is the second-largest state-run news agency in China after Xinhua News Agency.According to a 2016 news release, the Qiaobao app, launched in June that year, is part of a project of the Overseas Chinese Affairs Office (OCAO) of the Chinese State Council. The OCAO is an agency affiliated with the United Front Work Department, a primary tool of the Chinese Communist Party's foreign interference, according to a study by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, cited by Public Safety Canada.In February 2022, a Canadian Federal Court confirmed that there were "reasonable grounds" to believe that OCAO has engaged in espionage activities that harm Canadian interests.Qiaobao extensively collects users' personal information, including their real name, gender, date of birth, national ID number, mobile phone number, bank account number, mailing address, and email address. The system also automatically processes the location information of each user's device through GPS or WiFi. Foreign Interference The RCMP's investigation of the Quebec organizations came amid media reports about China's operation of secret police stations in Canada, including three in the Toronto area and two in Vancouver.The police stations gained public attention following revelations by the Spain-based human rights NGO Safeguard Defenders. While studying China's long-arm policing and transnational repression, the NGO found Chinese official statements boasting their success in coercing over 230,000 Chinese diaspora, including critics of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), to return to China on alleged criminal charges."Everyone at this table on the stage is opposed

Senators Woo and Oh Support Alleged Chinese Police Stations’ Lawsuit Against RCMP

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Sen. Yuen Pau Woo and Sen. Victor Oh are lending support to two Montreal-based organizations that are launching a $2.5 million lawsuit against the RCMP. The organizations are currently under police investigation for allegedly operating as secret Chinese police stations.

"Together with my colleague, Sen. Victor Oh, we're very pleased to be in Montreal to show our solidarity and support for the Chinese community in Quebec, and particularly the organizations in Quebec," Mr. Woo said at a press conference held at SFCGM on Dec. 1.

On Nov. 28, the two organizations, overseen by Xixi Li, who is also a Brossard city councillor, released a statement on the Chinese social media platform WeChat in which they accused the RCMP of initiating a "baseless public investigation." They said this has led to financial setbacks for the organizations, including a cut in government funding for both of them.
In March, the Quebec Ministry of Immigration told The Epoch Times that it has decided to end partnership with the CSQRS and the SFCGM. According to official online records, the ministry allocated $1,948,221 to the CSQRS from 2012 to 2020 under its PRInt and PASI integration programs. During the same period and under the same programs, the ministry provided $4,989,694 to the SFCGM.

Additionally, the organizations said the bank holding the mortgage for CSQRS and SFCGM has declared its intention not to renew the mortgage in March 2024.

For his part, Mr. Woo also said that the RCMP has not provided a definition of what constitutes a Chinese police station, nor has it specified what illegal activities the two organizations have been engaged in.

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'Not in the Criminal Code'

May Chiu, a moderator for the Dec. 1 press conference, said the RCMP interviewed the board members of CSQRS and SFCGM, but did not provide them with information regarding the allegations that the organizations are facing.

She claimed that there is a lack of evidence against the two organizations, stating that "being a police station is not in the Criminal Code."

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 The Sino-Quebec Centre in Brossard, Quebec, is seen on March 9, 2023. RCMP says it's investigating this organization, along with the Chinese Family Service of Greater Montreal, which are allegedly clandestine overseas Chinese police service stations. (Noé Chartier/The Epoch Times)
The Sino-Quebec Centre in Brossard, Quebec, is seen on March 9, 2023. RCMP says it's investigating this organization, along with the Chinese Family Service of Greater Montreal, which are allegedly clandestine overseas Chinese police service stations. (Noé Chartier/The Epoch Times)

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Sgt. Charles Poirier of the RCMP's C Division told The Epoch Times that the force can't offer further comments aside from confirming that the investigation "is still active."

"There have been no arrests made on this file to date. We are still asking people to contact us if they're victims of or witness to criminal acts," he wrote in a statement in French.

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Promoting Chinese App That Surveils Users

During the Dec. 1 press conference, Ms. Li denied that her organizations have engaged in any activities that could be considered foreign interference.

"We never did that, and I never get any complaint from any of our customers," she said.

She further denied that a Chinese mobile application which the organizations have reportedly been promoting poses security risks to its users.

The app, called Qiaobao, is being promoted by CSQRS and SFCGM to the local Chinese community. The app is developed by a Beijing-based technology company that operates as a subsidiary of the China News Service, which is the second-largest state-run news agency in China after Xinhua News Agency.

According to a 2016 news release, the Qiaobao app, launched in June that year, is part of a project of the Overseas Chinese Affairs Office (OCAO) of the Chinese State Council. The OCAO is an agency affiliated with the United Front Work Department, a primary tool of the Chinese Communist Party's foreign interference, according to a study by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, cited by Public Safety Canada.
In February 2022, a Canadian Federal Court confirmed that there were "reasonable grounds" to believe that OCAO has engaged in espionage activities that harm Canadian interests.

Qiaobao extensively collects users' personal information, including their real name, gender, date of birth, national ID number, mobile phone number, bank account number, mailing address, and email address. The system also automatically processes the location information of each user's device through GPS or WiFi.

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Foreign Interference

The RCMP's investigation of the Quebec organizations came amid media reports about China's operation of secret police stations in Canada, including three in the Toronto area and two in Vancouver.

The police stations gained public attention following revelations by the Spain-based human rights NGO Safeguard Defenders. While studying China's long-arm policing and transnational repression, the NGO found Chinese official statements boasting their success in coercing over 230,000 Chinese diaspora, including critics of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), to return to China on alleged criminal charges.

"Everyone at this table on the stage is opposed to foreign interference. Everyone ... is against transnational repression. And all of us up here are shocked to hear a suggestion that there are Chinese or any foreign police stations operating illegally in other countries," Mr. Woo said during the Dec. 1 press conference.

The senator told The Epoch Times in May that he helped draft a citizen petition against the creation of a foreign agent registry in Canada. The petition was sponsored by Liberal MP Chandra Arya in the House of Commons in April.
In June, Sen. Woo and Sen. Oh led a demonstration at Parliament Hill, advertised as an event commemorating the centenary of Canada's long-abolished Chinese Immigration Act, which prohibited Chinese immigrants. In a series of public events rallying support for the protest, the two senators urged the Chinese community to support the petition against the foreign agent registry.

Noé Chartier and NTD Television contributed to this report.