Russia Vetoes UN Security Council Resolution Condemning Its Attack on Ukraine; 3 Nations, Including China, Abstain

Russia vetoed a draft resolution of the United Nations Security Council to condemn Moscow for its invasion of Ukraine and to oust it from the organization on Feb. 25. Three other nations abstained from voting, while 11 voted in favor. Russia is allowed to veto any vote at the United Nations (U.N.) as it is a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council. The other permanent members are the United States, UK, France, and China. China, whose ruling communist regime was accused by the United States in recent days of giving tacit support to the invasion, abstained. The regime has likewise refused to characterize the invasion as an “invasion.” The move continues Beijing’s efforts to cultivate a public image that it is walking a middle line between the desires of Washington and Moscow. India and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) also abstained from the vote. India’s abstention was contentious as the nation has been cultivating a security partnership with the United States, but also has close ties with Russia including a long history of arms deals, the most recent of which was in December. Indian media reported shortly before the vote that Russia expected India to vote against the measure. The UAE, likewise, is considering a deal to jointly produce stealth fighter aircraft with Russia after a similar deal with the United States fell through. The resolution’s veto means that its proponents may call for a vote on a similar measure before the entire U.N. General Assembly, where no vetoes exist. There is currently no timetable for when such a vote will take place. Article 23 of the U.N. Charter prohibits permanent security council members from being ejected from the organization. The resolution condemning Russia called for the article to be amended so that Russia could be removed from the council. The next vote, while unlikely to succeed, is likely to be seen as something of a litmus test for political support of future actions against Russia, including sanctions. Follow Andrew Thornebrooke is a reporter for The Epoch Times covering China-related issues with a focus on defense, military affairs, and national security. He holds a master's in military history from Norwich University.

Russia Vetoes UN Security Council Resolution Condemning Its Attack on Ukraine; 3 Nations, Including China, Abstain

Russia vetoed a draft resolution of the United Nations Security Council to condemn Moscow for its invasion of Ukraine and to oust it from the organization on Feb. 25. Three other nations abstained from voting, while 11 voted in favor.

Russia is allowed to veto any vote at the United Nations (U.N.) as it is a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council. The other permanent members are the United States, UK, France, and China.

China, whose ruling communist regime was accused by the United States in recent days of giving tacit support to the invasion, abstained. The regime has likewise refused to characterize the invasion as an “invasion.” The move continues Beijing’s efforts to cultivate a public image that it is walking a middle line between the desires of Washington and Moscow.

India and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) also abstained from the vote.

India’s abstention was contentious as the nation has been cultivating a security partnership with the United States, but also has close ties with Russia including a long history of arms deals, the most recent of which was in December.

Indian media reported shortly before the vote that Russia expected India to vote against the measure.

The UAE, likewise, is considering a deal to jointly produce stealth fighter aircraft with Russia after a similar deal with the United States fell through.

The resolution’s veto means that its proponents may call for a vote on a similar measure before the entire U.N. General Assembly, where no vetoes exist.

There is currently no timetable for when such a vote will take place.

Article 23 of the U.N. Charter prohibits permanent security council members from being ejected from the organization. The resolution condemning Russia called for the article to be amended so that Russia could be removed from the council.

The next vote, while unlikely to succeed, is likely to be seen as something of a litmus test for political support of future actions against Russia, including sanctions.


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Andrew Thornebrooke is a reporter for The Epoch Times covering China-related issues with a focus on defense, military affairs, and national security. He holds a master's in military history from Norwich University.