Insurance Companies Note 40% Rise in Deaths

Some experts worry that an unprecedented rise in death rates of younger people is linked to the vaccine Insurance companies are reporting a jump in death payouts due to a dramatic rise in the number of deaths. The rise in the death rate is being corroborated by death certificate data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The death rate is up by 40 percent from pre-pandemic levels according to Scott Davison, chief executive of OneAmerica, a major insurance company based in Indianapolis. During an online news conference on Dec. 30, 2021, Davison said the change was unprecedented. “We are seeing, right now, the highest death rates we have seen in the history of this business,” he said. OneAmerica sells life insurance to employers nationwide, and similar figures are found throughout the industry. “The data is consistent across every player in that business,” Davison said. “And what we saw just in the third quarter—we’re seeing it continue into the fourth quarter—is that death rates are up 40 percent over what they were pre-pandemic. Just to give you an idea of how bad that is, a three-sigma or a one-in-200-year catastrophe would be a 10 percent increase over pre-pandemic. So 40 percent is just unheard of.” This 40 percent figure doesn’t represent folks dying of old age, but is instead a reflection of deaths in working-age adults, aged 18 to 65. However, what’s responsible for the alarming spike in fatalities in this age group isn’t clear. With all of the concern about COVID-19 lately, the contagion seems a likely choice. But according to Davison, something else is at play. He said the data coming from insurance companies—entities in the business of paying out when people die—show that the deaths being reported as COVID-19 fatalities “greatly understate” the actual deaths from working age people hit by the pandemic, as most of the claims being filed aren’t being classified as COVID-19 deaths. “It may not all be COVID on their death certificate, but deaths are up just huge, huge numbers,” he said. Also taking part in the news conference was Brian Tabor, president of the Indiana Hospital Association. He also noted a dramatic rise in illness from a different perspective. Tabor said hospitals across Indiana were being flooded with patients “with many different conditions.” In October 2021, The Times of India reported that health insurers saw a “huge surge in non-COVID claims,” with the head of interventional cardiology at a Mumbai, India, hospital noting a 40 percent increase in heart problems compared to the previous six to eight months. Ever since COVID-19 hit, the world has been bracing itself for huge numbers. Most recently in a White House press briefing on Dec. 17, 2021, President Joe Biden warned that unvaccinated Americans can look forward to a “winter of severe illness and death for yourselves, your families, and the hospitals you may soon overwhelm.” Still, such astronomical figures emerging all of a sudden are hard to fathom. The pandemic has worn on for nearly two years, and health officials have been keeping a close eye on the death count. What could account for such a dramatic jump at the end of 2021? Some suggest that opioid overdoses are to blame, particularly fentanyl. According to an analysis of data from the CDC, fentanyl fatalities have skyrocketed during the pandemic. From April 2020 to April 2021, more than 64,000 overdose deaths were attributed to fentanyl poisoning—nearly double the same period in 2019. The drug has become the number one cause of death for Americans between the ages of 18 and 45. But there’s more to the story than fentanyl. Although the rise in opioid overdoses accounts for some of the increased deaths in the United States, there’s no comparable opioid crisis in another country reporting a dramatic rise in their non-COVID-19 death rate. It’s tempting to dismiss this figure altogether, as many statistics that have emerged over the pandemic’s tenure initially caused alarm, only to remain in the realm of misinformation, speculation, and misinterpretation. We’ve heard breathless reports of mathematical models projecting an enormous surge of COVID-19 deaths that never came close to measuring up to actual data.  We now live in a world where we’re not sure if cases are actually rising or if there’s just an increase in testing; where we’re not sure if death statistics reflect people who have died from COVID-19 or simply died with COVID-19. As a result, we’ve become conditioned to take many headline-grabbing statistics with a grain of salt. But this insurance company figure is making experts take more notice. Dr. Robert Malone, an internationally recognized scientist and physician who’s credited with inventing the technology that drives the mRNA vaccines now being used to inoculate against COVID-19, published an article examining the implications behind this alarming 40 percent rise in deaths. Malone notes that several conspiracy t

Insurance Companies Note 40% Rise in Deaths

Some experts worry that an unprecedented rise in death rates of younger people is linked to the vaccine

Insurance companies are reporting a jump in death payouts due to a dramatic rise in the number of deaths. The rise in the death rate is being corroborated by death certificate data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The death rate is up by 40 percent from pre-pandemic levels according to Scott Davison, chief executive of OneAmerica, a major insurance company based in Indianapolis. During an online news conference on Dec. 30, 2021, Davison said the change was unprecedented.

“We are seeing, right now, the highest death rates we have seen in the history of this business,” he said.

OneAmerica sells life insurance to employers nationwide, and similar figures are found throughout the industry.

“The data is consistent across every player in that business,” Davison said. “And what we saw just in the third quarter—we’re seeing it continue into the fourth quarter—is that death rates are up 40 percent over what they were pre-pandemic. Just to give you an idea of how bad that is, a three-sigma or a one-in-200-year catastrophe would be a 10 percent increase over pre-pandemic. So 40 percent is just unheard of.”

This 40 percent figure doesn’t represent folks dying of old age, but is instead a reflection of deaths in working-age adults, aged 18 to 65. However, what’s responsible for the alarming spike in fatalities in this age group isn’t clear.

With all of the concern about COVID-19 lately, the contagion seems a likely choice. But according to Davison, something else is at play. He said the data coming from insurance companies—entities in the business of paying out when people die—show that the deaths being reported as COVID-19 fatalities “greatly understate” the actual deaths from working age people hit by the pandemic, as most of the claims being filed aren’t being classified as COVID-19 deaths.

“It may not all be COVID on their death certificate, but deaths are up just huge, huge numbers,” he said.

Also taking part in the news conference was Brian Tabor, president of the Indiana Hospital Association. He also noted a dramatic rise in illness from a different perspective. Tabor said hospitals across Indiana were being flooded with patients “with many different conditions.”

In October 2021, The Times of India reported that health insurers saw a “huge surge in non-COVID claims,” with the head of interventional cardiology at a Mumbai, India, hospital noting a 40 percent increase in heart problems compared to the previous six to eight months.

Ever since COVID-19 hit, the world has been bracing itself for huge numbers. Most recently in a White House press briefing on Dec. 17, 2021, President Joe Biden warned that unvaccinated Americans can look forward to a “winter of severe illness and death for yourselves, your families, and the hospitals you may soon overwhelm.”

Still, such astronomical figures emerging all of a sudden are hard to fathom. The pandemic has worn on for nearly two years, and health officials have been keeping a close eye on the death count. What could account for such a dramatic jump at the end of 2021?

Some suggest that opioid overdoses are to blame, particularly fentanyl. According to an analysis of data from the CDC, fentanyl fatalities have skyrocketed during the pandemic. From April 2020 to April 2021, more than 64,000 overdose deaths were attributed to fentanyl poisoning—nearly double the same period in 2019. The drug has become the number one cause of death for Americans between the ages of 18 and 45.

But there’s more to the story than fentanyl. Although the rise in opioid overdoses accounts for some of the increased deaths in the United States, there’s no comparable opioid crisis in another country reporting a dramatic rise in their non-COVID-19 death rate.

It’s tempting to dismiss this figure altogether, as many statistics that have emerged over the pandemic’s tenure initially caused alarm, only to remain in the realm of misinformation, speculation, and misinterpretation. We’ve heard breathless reports of mathematical models projecting an enormous surge of COVID-19 deaths that never came close to measuring up to actual data. 

We now live in a world where we’re not sure if cases are actually rising or if there’s just an increase in testing; where we’re not sure if death statistics reflect people who have died from COVID-19 or simply died with COVID-19. As a result, we’ve become conditioned to take many headline-grabbing statistics with a grain of salt.

But this insurance company figure is making experts take more notice.

Dr. Robert Malone, an internationally recognized scientist and physician who’s credited with inventing the technology that drives the mRNA vaccines now being used to inoculate against COVID-19, published an article examining the implications behind this alarming 40 percent rise in deaths.

Malone notes that several conspiracy theories have clouded our understanding throughout the pandemic, but he came to an uncomfortable conclusion that this insurance figure may have significantly more weight to it.

“I could hardly believe what I was reading,” Malone wrote. “This headline is a nuclear truth bomb masquerading as an insurance agent’s dry manila envelope full of actuarial tables.”

So if the dramatic rise in deaths among working age adults isn’t being caused by COVID-19 and drug overdoses, then what is the cause? Malone has suggested the unthinkable: The culprit may be the vaccines designed to guard against COVID-19. This heavily promoted vaccine has been repeatedly promised to be safe and effective. Many adults have now taken three doses, with a recommended fourth booster dose predicted for this fall. The shot has also been authorized for children as young as 5 years old.

“If this holds true, then the genetic vaccines so aggressively promoted have failed,” Malone wrote. “At worst, this report implies that the federal workplace vaccine mandates have driven what [appears] to be a true crime against humanity. Massive loss of life in (presumably) workers that have been forced to accept a toxic vaccine at higher frequency relative to the general population of Indiana.”

Before the insurance report, Malone was already an outspoken critic of the mRNA vaccines used to inoculate against COVID-19 and was recently booted off of social media platforms for voicing these views. But there are other signs that the vaccines many consider to be a savior may in fact be causing harm.

According to the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS), more than 1 million adverse events are associated with the COVID-19 vaccines, including more than 20,000 deaths. With other vaccines, the CDC typically consults VAERS numbers to monitor problems. But with the COVID-19 vaccines, health officials have generally been unconcerned with what this self reporting system suggests.

In a Senate Health Committee hearing on Jan. 11, Sen. Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.) asked if thousands of Americans really did die of the COVID-19 vaccines, as VAERS reports.

According to Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the CDC, VAERS numbers aren’t an accurate reflection of vaccine deaths.

“If you get hit by a car tragically after being vaccinated, that gets reported in the VAERS system,” Walensky said. “The vaccines are incredibly safe. They protect us against Omicron, they protect us against Delta, they protect us against COVID. They don’t protect us against every other form of mortality out there.”

When Tuberville asked Dr. Anthony Fauci for more clarity regarding the true fatalities linked to the vaccine, Fauci lamented the same flaw inherent in the VAERS system.

“If you get vaccinated and you walk out and get hit by a car, that is considered a death,” Fauci said. “That’s where it gets confusing. Everything that happens after the vaccination, even if you die of something completely obviously unrelated, it’s considered a death. So if I had metastatic cancer, got vaccinated, and died two weeks later that gets counted.”

Walensky noted that every one of the VAERS reports gets adjudicated.

However, there’s a pattern of a rise in deaths followed by the COVID-19 vaccines. One recent study reveals an increase in deaths in 145 countries following the rollout of the new vaccinations.

Quarterly reports from other insurance companies used in one recent analysis by American Thinker also show a rise in deaths during the same time period. Prudential showed an 87 percent increase in death benefits paid for the third quarter of 2021 compared to the same time period in 2020. Pacific Life and Annuity showed claims being up by more than 80 percent.

This American Thinker analysis drew a similar conclusion to Malone.

“It is possible that these deaths represent neglected care, the postponed treatments of heart disease, cancer, and the like. But that seems unlikely, given the spike in the third-quarter deaths. And presumably COVID already took the most vulnerable in 2020 in the absence of a vaccine. These massive claims seemed to be a phenomenon of the third quarter—about six months after the vaccine regimen became widely available,” the analysis reads.

Data analyst Jessica Rose adds more perspective. Rose, who holds a doctorate in computational biology with two post doctoral degrees in molecular biology and biochemistry, said the indications from the Indiana insurance company are simply that: indications. However, Rose noted that if the data we’re seeing in VAERS and other adverse event reporting systems hold true, the problem could in fact be much worse.

“And if what is being reported with regards to immune deficiencies associated with these injections is not simply anecdotal or representative of a small sub-cohort of individuals, we could be looking at a government imposed complete health disaster,” Rose wrote.