Elon Musk Is Right: The Road to Tyranny Is Paved With Fear

Commentary The founder, CEO, and chief engineer at SpaceX, Elon Musk, recently tweeted a rather pertinent message to his 62 million followers: “If you scare people enough, they will demand removal of freedom. This is the path to tyranny.” He’s right. It is. Joseph Stalin knew this better than most. One day, in front of his closest advisers, Stalin supposedly picked up a live rooster, plucked it, and placed it back down on the ground. The featherless bird, terrified and covered in blood, ran away. However, in this particular room, the door was closed. The rooster couldn’t escape. Left with no option, it returned to Stalin. Freezing cold, it rubbed itself between the dictator’s legs for warmth. Stalin looked at his advisers, smiled, and said: “Now, you see, people are like chickens. Pluck them, and then let them go.” Soon enough they’ll come back; after that, you “control them.” Stalin is dead. But similar methods of control are very much alive. Around the world, tyranny is on the rise. Fear has been weaponized. Members of the Australian Defence Force walk through Fitzroy Gardens in Melbourne as the city is under stage 4 lockdown restrictions, on Aug. 10, 2020. ( Quinn Rooney/Getty Images) When one thinks of tyranny, they often think of places like China, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, and Iran. And for good reason. These countries are synonymous with tyranny. They are places where civil liberties simply don’t exist. But what about Australia? What about Canada? What about the United States? Unlike the aforementioned countries, where malevolent tyranny reigns supreme, Australia, Canada, and the United States offer their citizens a “benevolent” form of tyranny, where some, but not enough, civil liberties exist. Now, before I am accused of being hyperbolic, let me remind you that in Australia, up until very recently, COVID internment camps existed. Governments, aided by the mainstream media, have weaponized fear. Because of this, society has broken into two very different groups. One group is suffering from Stockholm Syndrome, an emotional response in which hostages develop a psychological bond with their captors. It’s not a logical response. It’s not based on reasoning. It’s based on fear. Again, before I am accused of hyperbole, let me point you in the direction of the self-labeled “Fauci groupies,” the thrice vaccinated, mask-loving celebrities who have spent inordinate amounts of time singing the praises of Anthony Fauci. Now, of course, I am not accusing Dr. Fauci of holding anyone hostage. But he has been instrumental in the policies that have left many people feeling like hostages. He was key to the introduction of unnecessary lockdowns—lockdowns that left people without hope, without freedom, without work, and, most of all, without a connection to the broader community. Millions of Americans may be suffering from Stockholm Syndrome, but millions of others are experiencing something very different. It’s called London Syndrome, a condition in which those taken hostage refuse to do what their captors ask of them. We saw it last week, when thousands of Americans took part in the Defeat the Mandate rally. We have seen similar protests in Australia. In fact, we have seen demonstrations across the so-called “free world,” from the Netherlands to New Zealand. In Canada, meanwhile, truckers are out in protest. Recently, thousands of Canadians gathered in the capital of Ottawa to protest vaccine mandates. To be clear, these truckers are not against vaccines; they are against mandates. They are not, contrary to popular opinion, just a “small, fringe minority.” If in doubt, just ask Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. What do the truckers want? They believe that, in a free world, human beings should be free to make their own decisions. They should not be forced to do anything that they don’t feel comfortable doing. Self-determination still exists, or at least it did up until quite recently. The “Freedom Convoy,” as the truckers aptly named it, has captured the attention of the world. The truckers are demonstrating against government overreach in the country’s capital. Government overreach is something many readers, I’m sure, are all too familiar with. It’s also something, I’m sure, many readers are fed up with. A truck taking part in the “Freedom Convoy” that left from an area south of Montreal on Jan. 28, 2021. (Noé Chartier/The Epoch Times) Freedom, something many of us took for granted before the pandemic brought the world to a screeching halt, is in short supply. Hope has been replaced by a profound sense of despair, with fear dominating the landscape. This is not a glitch in the system; it’s by design. Those in power actively promote it. Why? As Stalin knew only too well, a more fearful society is easier to control. A more fearful society never wants to go anywhere; a more fearful society is a more compliant one. However, as the truckers in Canada have shown us, we needn’t be afraid. Instead, we must be

Elon Musk Is Right: The Road to Tyranny Is Paved With Fear

Commentary

The founder, CEO, and chief engineer at SpaceX, Elon Musk, recently tweeted a rather pertinent message to his 62 million followers: “If you scare people enough, they will demand removal of freedom. This is the path to tyranny.”

He’s right. It is. Joseph Stalin knew this better than most. One day, in front of his closest advisers, Stalin supposedly picked up a live rooster, plucked it, and placed it back down on the ground. The featherless bird, terrified and covered in blood, ran away. However, in this particular room, the door was closed. The rooster couldn’t escape. Left with no option, it returned to Stalin. Freezing cold, it rubbed itself between the dictator’s legs for warmth. Stalin looked at his advisers, smiled, and said: “Now, you see, people are like chickens. Pluck them, and then let them go.” Soon enough they’ll come back; after that, you “control them.”

Stalin is dead. But similar methods of control are very much alive. Around the world, tyranny is on the rise. Fear has been weaponized.

Epoch Times Photo
Members of the Australian Defence Force walk through Fitzroy Gardens in Melbourne as the city is under stage 4 lockdown restrictions, on Aug. 10, 2020. ( Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

When one thinks of tyranny, they often think of places like China, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, and Iran. And for good reason. These countries are synonymous with tyranny. They are places where civil liberties simply don’t exist.

But what about Australia? What about Canada? What about the United States? Unlike the aforementioned countries, where malevolent tyranny reigns supreme, Australia, Canada, and the United States offer their citizens a “benevolent” form of tyranny, where some, but not enough, civil liberties exist. Now, before I am accused of being hyperbolic, let me remind you that in Australia, up until very recently, COVID internment camps existed.

Governments, aided by the mainstream media, have weaponized fear. Because of this, society has broken into two very different groups. One group is suffering from Stockholm Syndrome, an emotional response in which hostages develop a psychological bond with their captors. It’s not a logical response. It’s not based on reasoning. It’s based on fear.

Again, before I am accused of hyperbole, let me point you in the direction of the self-labeled “Fauci groupies,” the thrice vaccinated, mask-loving celebrities who have spent inordinate amounts of time singing the praises of Anthony Fauci. Now, of course, I am not accusing Dr. Fauci of holding anyone hostage. But he has been instrumental in the policies that have left many people feeling like hostages. He was key to the introduction of unnecessary lockdowns—lockdowns that left people without hope, without freedom, without work, and, most of all, without a connection to the broader community.

Millions of Americans may be suffering from Stockholm Syndrome, but millions of others are experiencing something very different. It’s called London Syndrome, a condition in which those taken hostage refuse to do what their captors ask of them. We saw it last week, when thousands of Americans took part in the Defeat the Mandate rally. We have seen similar protests in Australia. In fact, we have seen demonstrations across the so-called “free world,” from the Netherlands to New Zealand.

In Canada, meanwhile, truckers are out in protest. Recently, thousands of Canadians gathered in the capital of Ottawa to protest vaccine mandates. To be clear, these truckers are not against vaccines; they are against mandates. They are not, contrary to popular opinion, just a “small, fringe minority.” If in doubt, just ask Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. What do the truckers want? They believe that, in a free world, human beings should be free to make their own decisions. They should not be forced to do anything that they don’t feel comfortable doing.

Self-determination still exists, or at least it did up until quite recently. The “Freedom Convoy,” as the truckers aptly named it, has captured the attention of the world. The truckers are demonstrating against government overreach in the country’s capital. Government overreach is something many readers, I’m sure, are all too familiar with. It’s also something, I’m sure, many readers are fed up with.

Epoch Times Photo
A truck taking part in the “Freedom Convoy” that left from an area south of Montreal on Jan. 28, 2021. (Noé Chartier/The Epoch Times)

Freedom, something many of us took for granted before the pandemic brought the world to a screeching halt, is in short supply. Hope has been replaced by a profound sense of despair, with fear dominating the landscape. This is not a glitch in the system; it’s by design. Those in power actively promote it.

Why?

As Stalin knew only too well, a more fearful society is easier to control. A more fearful society never wants to go anywhere; a more fearful society is a more compliant one. However, as the truckers in Canada have shown us, we needn’t be afraid. Instead, we must be brave. We must be engaged, informed, and aware of the abuses that are occurring. We have two options: bow down and acquiesce, or stand up and have our voices heard. Which one sounds more appealing?

Views expressed in this article are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Epoch Times.


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John Mac Ghlionn is a researcher and essayist. His work has been published, among others, by the New York Post, Sydney Morning Herald, Newsweek, National Review, and The Spectator US. He covers psychology and social relations, and has a keen interest in social dysfunction and media manipulation.