2.7 Billion Cameras for Surveillance, Millions of People Go Missing Every Year | SkyNet Project

2.7 Billion Cameras for Surveillance, Millions of People Go Missing Every Year | SkyNet Project

2.7 Billion Cameras for Surveillance, Millions of People Go Missing Every Year | SkyNet Project

Whenever China experiences a nationwide event, the Chinese Communist Party uses various means to maintain as much stability as possible. In other words, the CCP has control over all aspects of society, stifling dissidence from people such as human rights activists and certain religious groups. When it comes to global events such as the winter Olympics, the CCP will put particular care into making sure that stability is maintained throughout the globally-witnessed event. As such, many WeChat accounts have been blocked and several human rights lawyers have been arrested as well. As for the rest, China has put them under house arrest and have maintained tight surveillance over their every action through a tightly monitored network.

The biggest piece of technology that allows the CCP to achieve this is their country-wide video surveillance system.

According to official Chinese media, their video surveillance system was completed back in September of 2017.

In recent years, the CCP has used more and more technologically advanced methods to monitor people, from the Golden Shield Project to SkyNet and in 2015, the Sharp Eyes Project was launched for rural areas of China. With omnipresent surveillance paired with its advanced facial recognition AI technology, China has a massive database of its citizens, able to keep track of every single person’s movements. As early as 2004, CCP authorities had already proposed ideas for “peacekeeping” in China, eventually leading to the SkyNet project.

This “SkyNet” is a video surveillance system invested by the CCP where numerous surveillance cameras are installed in various locations such as traffic routes, stations, malls and theaters. With the addition of their advanced global satellite positioning systems and their face recognition and image collection capabilities, the public is being monitored at all times, eliminating any sense of personal privacy.