The Biggest Flood of the Yellow River in 30 Years | No. 3 Flood | Dams Collapsed | Landslides

The Biggest Flood of the Yellow River in 30 Years | No. 3 Flood | Dams Collapsed | Landslides

The Biggest Flood of the Yellow River in 30 Years | No. 3 Flood | Dams Collapsed | Landslides

Due to the continuous heavy rains in the Yellow River basin in recent days, the water level of the Yellow River has been soaring and the flow rate has increased dramatically. At the Tongguan Hydrological Station in the middle reaches of the river, the flow rate rose to 5,090 cubic meters per second at 11 o'clock in the evening of October 5, forming the "2021 Yellow River No. 3 Flood". As floodwater continued to rush downstream, at 3:20 pm on the 6th, the Yellow River Conservancy Commission issued a yellow flood warning in Sanmenxia City, Henan Province. On the 7th, the Sanmenxia Reservoir measured the largest flood since 1979, with an inflow of 8,360 cubic meters per second. The outbound flow rate was 7,990 cubic meters per second, breaking the historical record yet again. According to the China Water Resources website, as of the 6th, the Sanmenxia Reservoir had opened all 24 gates and 2 tunnels for emergency flood discharge. Recently, there has been a shortage of electricity in many parts of the mainland, with more than 20 provinces and cities imposing power restrictions, affecting production and people's daily life, and the tight supply of coal is one of the reasons. On September 29, Shanxi Province had just signed agreements with Hebei, Fujian, Guangdong, Shanghai and 14 other provinces and cities "to ensure the coal supply of fourteen provinces and cities in the fourth quarter". This round of heavy rainfall will undoubtedly add pressure to Shanxi Province to fulfill the contract. At present, it’s not clear how long the coal mine shutdown will last in Shanxi. Recently, there has been a shortage of electricity in many parts of the mainland, with more than 20 provinces and cities imposing power restrictions, affecting production and people's daily life, and the tight supply of coal is one of the reasons. Mr. Jin, a mainland scholar, has visited Shanxi coal mines several times, and his analysis was quoted by Radio Free Asia on Oct. 7 as saying that due to years of over-mining and lack of maintenance, local cavities have appeared below the surface in some areas of Shanxi, which can easily cause landslides and collapse whenever there’s heavy rain. On September 29, Shanxi Province had just signed agreements with Hebei, Fujian, Guangdong, Shanghai and 14 other provinces and cities "to ensure the coal supply of fourteen provinces and cities in the fourth quarter". This round of heavy rainfall will undoubtedly add pressure to Shanxi Province to fulfill the contract. At present, it’s not clear how long the coal mine shutdown will last in Shanxi.